Blue Jays at the break

Some numbers on the first half of the Blue Jays’ 2007 season …

  • For the first time since 2004, Toronto heads into the All-Star break with a losing record (43-44 — .494). In 2006, the club posted a mark of 49-39 (.557) prior to the Midsummer Classic. The Jays managed a franchise-best 53-34 (.609) record in the first half during the 1992 season.
  • Through action Sunday, the Blue Jays’ season attendance mark at Rogers Centre is 1,194,980, an average of 26,555 fans per game (45 home contests). In 2006, the Jays drew 1,186,106 prior to the All-Star break (46 home games), for an average of 25,785 per contest. The highest attendance the Jays have drawn prior to the break was 2,416,036 during the ’92 campaign. That averaged out to a whopping 49,307 fans per game.
  • At .294, Alex Rios currently owns the highest batting average on the Blue Jays. This marks the first time since 2002 that Toronto has not had a player (minimum 250 at-bats) with a .300-plus batting average in the first half of the season. In 2006, Rios (.330), Vernon Wells (.311) and Shea Hillenbrand (.305) all managed the feat. The highest average ever posted by a Blue Jay in the first half was .395, accomplished by John Olerud in 1993.
  • Roy Halladay‘s 10 first-half wins rank 10th all-time. The current Blue Jay ace had 12 prior to the break last season. David Wells, meanwhile, is the franchise record-holder, having won 15 games before the Midsummer Classic in 2000.
  • A.J. Burnett‘s 106 first-half strikeouts place him eighth on the all-time list, which is headed by Roger Clemens, who struck out 140 batters prior to the All-Star break in 1997.
  • Rios also leads the current club with 53 RBIs. Wells had 66 RBIs in the first half last season to lead the club. Neither of these marks falls in the Top 10 all-time. Carlos Delgado set the franchise record with 97 RBIs prior to the All-Star game in 2003.
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